What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work

Luke Fletcher, Dilys Robinson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

Abstract

We spend a lot of our time at work. Around eight hours a day, for at least 40 weeks every year, for 40 years or so… It’s an unsurprising hypothesis that being bored, feeling disconnected, and seeing no point in our work is likely to have a damaging effect. While the impact may not be quite as severe as the often-quoted Dostoevsky prognosis below, people who find no real meaning in their work are likely to suffer (emotionally and perhaps also mentally and physically), especially if they do not have absorbing interests outside work to bolster their self-esteem and sense of self-worth.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThoughts for the day
Subtitle of host publicationIES perspectives on HR 2016
Place of PublicationBrighton (UK)
PublisherInstitute for Employment Studies
Pages14-20
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-8518-4455-5
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

Publication series

NameIES Report
PublisherIntitute fro Emplyment Studies
Volume508

Fingerprint

Self Concept
Emotions
Self-esteem
Meaningful work

Keywords

  • meaningfulness
  • work context

Cite this

Fletcher, L., & Robinson, D. (2016). What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work. In Thoughts for the day: IES perspectives on HR 2016 (pp. 14-20). (IES Report; Vol. 508). Brighton (UK): Institute for Employment Studies.
Fletcher, Luke ; Robinson, Dilys. / What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work. Thoughts for the day: IES perspectives on HR 2016. Brighton (UK) : Institute for Employment Studies, 2016. pp. 14-20 (IES Report).
@inbook{0b32c73f94794a25881c1e63685ca974,
title = "What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work",
abstract = "We spend a lot of our time at work. Around eight hours a day, for at least 40 weeks every year, for 40 years or so… It’s an unsurprising hypothesis that being bored, feeling disconnected, and seeing no point in our work is likely to have a damaging effect. While the impact may not be quite as severe as the often-quoted Dostoevsky prognosis below, people who find no real meaning in their work are likely to suffer (emotionally and perhaps also mentally and physically), especially if they do not have absorbing interests outside work to bolster their self-esteem and sense of self-worth.",
keywords = "meaningfulness, work context",
author = "Luke Fletcher and Dilys Robinson",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
language = "English",
series = "IES Report",
publisher = "Institute for Employment Studies",
pages = "14--20",
booktitle = "Thoughts for the day",

}

Fletcher, L & Robinson, D 2016, What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work. in Thoughts for the day: IES perspectives on HR 2016. IES Report, vol. 508, Institute for Employment Studies, Brighton (UK), pp. 14-20.

What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work. / Fletcher, Luke; Robinson, Dilys.

Thoughts for the day: IES perspectives on HR 2016. Brighton (UK) : Institute for Employment Studies, 2016. p. 14-20 (IES Report; Vol. 508).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

TY - CHAP

T1 - What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work

AU - Fletcher, Luke

AU - Robinson, Dilys

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - We spend a lot of our time at work. Around eight hours a day, for at least 40 weeks every year, for 40 years or so… It’s an unsurprising hypothesis that being bored, feeling disconnected, and seeing no point in our work is likely to have a damaging effect. While the impact may not be quite as severe as the often-quoted Dostoevsky prognosis below, people who find no real meaning in their work are likely to suffer (emotionally and perhaps also mentally and physically), especially if they do not have absorbing interests outside work to bolster their self-esteem and sense of self-worth.

AB - We spend a lot of our time at work. Around eight hours a day, for at least 40 weeks every year, for 40 years or so… It’s an unsurprising hypothesis that being bored, feeling disconnected, and seeing no point in our work is likely to have a damaging effect. While the impact may not be quite as severe as the often-quoted Dostoevsky prognosis below, people who find no real meaning in their work are likely to suffer (emotionally and perhaps also mentally and physically), especially if they do not have absorbing interests outside work to bolster their self-esteem and sense of self-worth.

KW - meaningfulness

KW - work context

M3 - Other chapter contribution

T3 - IES Report

SP - 14

EP - 20

BT - Thoughts for the day

PB - Institute for Employment Studies

CY - Brighton (UK)

ER -

Fletcher L, Robinson D. What’s the point? The importance of meaningful work. In Thoughts for the day: IES perspectives on HR 2016. Brighton (UK): Institute for Employment Studies. 2016. p. 14-20. (IES Report).