Cathy Slack

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General

I joined the School of Life & Health Sciences in August 2016 as a Lecturer in Biosciences, after conducting postdoctoral research with Dame Prof. Linda Partridge (Institute of Healthy Ageing, University College London) and Prof. William Chia (MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, Kings College London). My research background covers ageing biology, cell signalling and Drosophila genetics. 

Research interests

My current research aims to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern how an animal ages using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a model system. Current key research topics of interest include:

  • Understanding the regulatory networks that control the activity of key proteins within the insulin signalling pathway.
  • Exploring the role of energy balance and metabolism in regulating lifespan.
  • Developing pharmacological interventions that extend lifespan and improve life-long health.

Qualifications

PhD Genetics, Imperial College London, 2002.

BSc(Hons) Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, 1998.

Employment

  • 2016 – date: Lecturer in Biosciences, School of Life & Health Sciences, Aston University.
  • 2005 – 2016: Senior Postdoctoral Research Associate/Max Planck Research Fellow, Institute of Healthy Ageing, University College London.
  • 2002 – 2005: Postdoctoral Research Associate, MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, Kings College London.

Membership of Professional Bodies

  • Fellow of the Higher Eduation Academy (FHEA).
  • Member of the Biochemical Society.
  • Member of the British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA).

 

Teaching Activity

Undergraduate

  • BC1005 Genetics
  • BY2EN2 Endocrinology

Postgraduate

  • BI4014 Cellular Differentiation in Developmental Biology
  • BI4018 Ageing and Regenerative Medicine

Programme Director: MRes in Biosciences

Professional/editorial offices

  • Trustee for the British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA).

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