Bernstein's theory of pedagogic discourse: linguistics, educational policy and practice in the UK English/literacy classroom

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Abstract

In “The English Patient: English Grammar and teaching in the Twentieth Century”, Hudson and Walmsley (2005) contens that the decline of grammar in schools was linked to a similar decline in English universities, where no serious research or teaching on English grammar took place. This article argues that such a decline was due not only to a lack of research, but also because it suited educational policies of the time. It applies Bernstein’s theory of pedagogic discourse (1990 & 1996) to the case study of the debate surrounding the introduction of a national curriculum in English in England in the late 1980s and the National Literacy Strategy in the 1990s, to demonstrate the links between academic theory and educational policy.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-47
Number of pages16
JournalEnglish Teaching
Volume4
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Bibliographic note

Copyright of the University of Waikato. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License.

    Keywords

  • grammar, English, pedagogic discourse, National Literacy, Strategy, educational policy

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