Compressed orally disintegrating tablets: excipients evolution and formulation strategies

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Introduction: Orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) have emerged as one of the novel solid oral dosage forms with a potential to deliver a wide range of drug candidates to both paediatric and geriatric patient populations. Of the plethora of available technologies, compression of excipients offers a cost-effective and translatable methodology for the manufacture of ODTs. Areas covered: The review is a modest endeavour from the authors to assemble literature published over the last couple of decades on formulation development of compressed ODT. It describes the main ODT excipients used since the introduction of this dosage form in the 1990s and explores the switch from cellulose-based excipients towards sugar/polyols. Furthermore, it unfolds the key properties of ODT fillers, binders and disintegrants with an emphasis on their advantages and drawbacks. The review also provides a critical assessment of the various strategies employed for performance enhancement of compressed ODT with a focus on the underlying mechanisms for fast disintegration and acceptable mechanical strength. Expert opinion: Recent increase in the total number of compression-based technologies for ODT development promises to reduce the manufacturing cost of this dosage form in the future. However, some of the developed methods may affect the stability of tablets due to susceptibility to moisture, collapse of pores or the generation of less stable polymorphs which require rigorous testing prior to commercialization. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.

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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)651-663
Number of pages13
JournalExpert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Volume10
Issue number5
Early online date7 Feb 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2013

    Keywords

  • co-processing, compression, mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose, orally disintegrating tablet, particle engineering, swallowing difficulty

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