The upstream Variable Number Tandem Repeat polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase type A gene influences trigeminal pain-related evoked responses

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

View graph of relations Save citation

Authors

  • Cherubino di Lorenzo
  • Andrea Daverio
  • Patrizio Pasqualetti
  • Gianluca Coppola
  • Ioannis Giannoudas
  • Ylenia Barone
  • Gaetano S. Grieco
  • Cinzia Niolu
  • Esterina Pascale
  • Ferdinando Nicoletti
  • Francesco Pierelli
  • Alberto Siracusano
  • Stefano SeriORCiD: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9247-8102
  • Giorgio di Lorenzo

Research units

Abstract

Monoamines have an important role in neural plasticity, a key factor in cortical pain processing that promotes changes in neuronal network connectivity. Monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) is an enzyme that, due to its modulating role in monoaminergic activity, could play a role in cortical pain processing. The X-linked MAOA gene is characterized by an allelic variant of length, the MAOA upstream Variable Number Tandem Repeat (MAOA-uVNTR) region polymorphism. Two allelic variants of this gene are known, the high-activity MAOA (HAM) and low-activity MAOA (LAM). We investigated the role of MAOA-uVNTR in cortical pain processing in a group of healthy individuals measured by the trigeminal electric pain-related evoked potential (tPREP) elicited by repeated painful stimulation. A group of healthy volunteers was genotyped to detect MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism. Electrical tPREPs were recorded by stimulating the right supraorbital nerve with a concentric electrode. The N2 and P2 component amplitude and latency as well as the N2-P2 inter-peak amplitude were measured. The recording was divided into three blocks, each containing 10 consecutive stimuli and the N2-P2 amplitude was compared between blocks. Of the 67 volunteers, 37 were HAM and 30 were LAM. HAM subjects differed from LAM subjects in terms of amplitude of the grand-averaged and first-block N2-P2 responses (HAM>LAM). The N2-P2 amplitude decreased between the first and third block in HAM subjects but not LAM subjects. The MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism seemed to influence the brain response in a repeated tPREP paradigm and suggested a role of the MAOA as a modulator of neural plasticity related to cortical pain processing. Monoamines have an important role in neural plasticity, a key factor in cortical pain processing that promotes changes in neuronal network connectivity. Monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) is an enzyme that, due to its modulating role in monoaminergic activity, could play a role in cortical pain processing. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume39
Issue number3
Early online date4 Feb 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2014

    Keywords

  • habituation, human, monoamine, neural plasticity, pain-related evoked potential, sensitization

DOI

Employable Graduates; Exploitable Research

Copy the text from this field...