Anger rumination and self-reported aggression amongst British and Hong Kong Chinese athletes: a cross cultural comparison

J.P. Maxwell, Elisabeth Moores, C.C.F. Chow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous work has determined relationships between provocation, anger rumination, and aggression in British athletes (Maxwell, 2004); however, the reliability of these findings and their generality across diverse cultures has not been examined. Therefore, a comparison of British and Hong Kong (HK) Chinese athletes’ propensity for rumination and aggression was undertaken. Provocation and thoughts of revenge were significantly associated with the self-reported aggression of both British and HK Chinese athletes. Frequency of aggression was similar across cultures except for a tendency for British male contact sport athletes to report greater frequency of aggressive behaviour. HK Chinese athletes tended to report higher frequencies of thoughts relating to understanding the causes of anger and higher incidence of perceived provocation. It was concluded that the pattern of aggressive behaviour was similar across the two cultures when opportunities for aggression are infrequent, but that HK Chinese athletes may inhibit aggressive responding even when opportunities are frequent.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-27
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2007

Keywords

  • provocation
  • anger rumination
  • aggression
  • British athletes
  • culture
  • Hong Kong
  • Chinese athletes

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