Antecedents and outcomes of abusive supervision: test of a trickle-down model

Samuel Aryee*, Zhen X. Chen, Li-Yun Sun, Yaw A. Debrah

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors examined antecedents of abusive supervision and the relative importance of interactional and procedural justice as mediators of the relationship between abusive supervision and the work outcomes of affective organizational commitment and individual- and organization-directed citizenship behaviors. Data were obtained from subordinate-supervisor dyads from a telecommunication company located in southeastern China. Results of moderated regression analysis revealed that authoritarian leadership style moderated the relationship between supervisors' perceptions of interactional justice and abusive supervision such that the relationship was stronger for supervisors high rather than low in authoritarian leadership style. In addition, results of structural equation modeling analysis revealed that subordinates' perceptions of interactional but not procedural justice fully mediated the relationship between abusive supervision and the work outcomes. Implications for future investigations of abusive supervision are discussed. Copyright 2007 by the American Psychological Association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-201
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume92
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • abusive supervision
  • authoritarian leadership style
  • organizational justice
  • trickle-down model

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