Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring

Thomas D.P. Allsop, T. Earthgrowl, R. Revees, D.J. Webb, M. Miller, B. Jones, I. Bennion

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A series of in-line curvature sensors on a garment are used to monitor the thoracic and abdominal movements of a human during respiration. These results are used to obtain volumetric tidal changes of the human torso showing reasonable agreement with a spirometer used simultaneously to record the volume at the mouth during breathing. The curvature sensors are based upon long period gratings written in a progressive three layered fibre that are insensitive to refractive index changes. The sensor platform consists of the long period grating laid upon a carbon fibre ribbon, which is encapsulated in a low temperature curing silicone rubber. An array of sensors is also used to reconstruct the shape changes of a resuscitation manikin during simulated respiration. The data for reconstruction is obtained by two methods of multiplexing and interrogation: firstly using the transmission spectral profile of the LPG's attenuation bands measured using an optical spectrum analyser; secondly using a derivative spectroscopy technique.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSmart medical and biomedical sensor technology II
EditorsBrian M. Cullum
PublisherSPIE
Pages148-156
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)978-0-8194-5541-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004
EventSmart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology II - Philadelphia, PA, United States
Duration: 25 Oct 2004 → …

Publication series

NameSPIE proceedings
PublisherSPIE
Volume5588
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Conference

ConferenceSmart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology II
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia, PA
Period25/10/04 → …

Fingerprint

Monitoring
Sensors
Resuscitation
Liquefied petroleum gas
Multiplexing
Silicones
Carbon fibers
Curing
Refractive index
Rubber
Spectroscopy
Derivatives
Fibers
Temperature

Bibliographical note

Thomas D. Allsop ; Tim Earthrowl ; Richard Revees ; David J. Webb ; Martin Miller ; Barrie W. Jones and Ian Bennion "Application of long-period grating sensors to respiratory function monitoring", Proc. SPIE 5588, Smart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology II, 148 (December 7, 2004);

Copyright 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.569297

Keywords

  • curvature sensing
  • respiratory monitoring
  • long period gratings

Cite this

Allsop, T. D. P., Earthgrowl, T., Revees, R., Webb, D. J., Miller, M., Jones, B., & Bennion, I. (2004). Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring. In B. M. Cullum (Ed.), Smart medical and biomedical sensor technology II (pp. 148-156). (SPIE proceedings; Vol. 5588). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.569297
Allsop, Thomas D.P. ; Earthgrowl, T. ; Revees, R. ; Webb, D.J. ; Miller, M. ; Jones, B. ; Bennion, I. / Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring. Smart medical and biomedical sensor technology II. editor / Brian M. Cullum. SPIE, 2004. pp. 148-156 (SPIE proceedings).
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Allsop, TDP, Earthgrowl, T, Revees, R, Webb, DJ, Miller, M, Jones, B & Bennion, I 2004, Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring. in BM Cullum (ed.), Smart medical and biomedical sensor technology II. SPIE proceedings, vol. 5588, SPIE, pp. 148-156, Smart Medical and Biomedical Sensor Technology II, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 25/10/04. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.569297

Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring. / Allsop, Thomas D.P.; Earthgrowl, T.; Revees, R.; Webb, D.J.; Miller, M.; Jones, B.; Bennion, I.

Smart medical and biomedical sensor technology II. ed. / Brian M. Cullum. SPIE, 2004. p. 148-156 (SPIE proceedings; Vol. 5588).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Allsop TDP, Earthgrowl T, Revees R, Webb DJ, Miller M, Jones B et al. Application of long period gratings sensors to respiratory function monitoring. In Cullum BM, editor, Smart medical and biomedical sensor technology II. SPIE. 2004. p. 148-156. (SPIE proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.569297