Authors' response

clinical evaluation of the MPS 9000 macular pigment screener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As a research group with no commercial interest in any macular pigment optical density (MPOD) measurement devices or nutritional supplements, we feel that we were well-placed to carry out an independent clinical assessment of the reliability of the MPS 9000 (Tinsley Precision Instruments, Redhill, Surrey, UK). Our study was prompted by the fact that we could not find any reported coefficient of repeatability value within the literature, and none was provided by the manufacturer.1 We had planned to use this instrument in our own research studies investigating the impact of nutritional supplementation on MPOD. For this purpose, we needed …
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-432
Number of pages2
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume95
Issue number3
Early online date22 Oct 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

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Macular Pigment

Bibliographical note

This article has been accepted for publication in British journal of ophthalmology.
The definitive copyedited, typeset version Bartlett, H & Eperjesi, F 2011, 'Authors' response: clinical evaluation of the MPS 9000 macular pigment screener', British journal of ophthalmology, vol 95, no. 3, pp. 431-432 is available online at http://bjo.bmj.com/content/95/3/432

Cite this

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Authors' response : clinical evaluation of the MPS 9000 macular pigment screener. / Bartlett, Hannah; Eperjesi, Frank.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 95, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 431-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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