Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology

Joseph Lunec, J.W. Winkles, Helen R. Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite 50 years of intensive research in the field of RFs, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation, some of the serological tests used for measuring autoantibodies remain an anachronism. Clinical chemistry has the potential technology to provide the rheumatologist with automated quantitative antibody/antigen measurements. It can also widen the range of tests available for disease monitoring, which would be helpful in the management of the chronic rheumatic diseases. Traditional laboratory tests must be superseded by new developments, derived from fundamental research, if we are to improve the diagnosis and management of the rheumatic diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-152
Number of pages22
JournalBaillière's Clinical Rheumatology
Volume2
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1988

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Rheumatology
Rheumatic Diseases
Clinical Chemistry
Serologic Tests
Autoimmunity
Research
Autoantibodies
Chronic Disease
Inflammation
Technology
Antigens
Antibodies
Rheumatologists

Cite this

Lunec, J., Winkles, J. W., & Griffiths, H. R. (1988). Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology. Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology, 2(1), 131-152.
Lunec, Joseph ; Winkles, J.W. ; Griffiths, Helen R. / Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology. In: Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology. 1988 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 131-152.
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Lunec, J, Winkles, JW & Griffiths, HR 1988, 'Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology', Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 131-152.

Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology. / Lunec, Joseph; Winkles, J.W.; Griffiths, Helen R.

In: Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology, Vol. 2, No. 1, 04.1988, p. 131-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Lunec J, Winkles JW, Griffiths HR. Clinical biochemical measurements in rheumatology. Baillière's Clinical Rheumatology. 1988 Apr;2(1):131-152.