From Trailing & Failing to Learning & Progressing: A bespoke approach to failure in engineering education

Robin P Clark, Jane E Andrews

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Starting with the research question “How can we reverse the negative impact of failure on engineering students’ futures?” the ‘Changing Futures Project’ is a five year longitudinal project which aims to identify and address the pedagogy of failure, and in doing so make a positive difference to students’ educational outcomes and progress. It builds on previous work [1, 2] to look at the issues behind ‘failure’ from the perspectives of individual students. In looking at the issues through the eyes of the students themselves this paper makes a distinctive contribution to current debates to the field of engineering education in general, but particularly in the areas of attrition, retention and student support. The paper ends with a total of 10 recommendations for institutions, colleagues and students
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationREEN Annual Symposium
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jul 2017

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Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2016 | Global Engineering Deans Council | All rights Reserved

Cite this

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From Trailing & Failing to Learning & Progressing : A bespoke approach to failure in engineering education. / Clark, Robin P; Andrews, Jane E.

REEN Annual Symposium. 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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T1 - From Trailing & Failing to Learning & Progressing

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N1 - Copyright © 2016 | Global Engineering Deans Council | All rights Reserved

PY - 2017/7/6

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N2 - Starting with the research question “How can we reverse the negative impact of failure on engineering students’ futures?” the ‘Changing Futures Project’ is a five year longitudinal project which aims to identify and address the pedagogy of failure, and in doing so make a positive difference to students’ educational outcomes and progress. It builds on previous work [1, 2] to look at the issues behind ‘failure’ from the perspectives of individual students. In looking at the issues through the eyes of the students themselves this paper makes a distinctive contribution to current debates to the field of engineering education in general, but particularly in the areas of attrition, retention and student support. The paper ends with a total of 10 recommendations for institutions, colleagues and students

AB - Starting with the research question “How can we reverse the negative impact of failure on engineering students’ futures?” the ‘Changing Futures Project’ is a five year longitudinal project which aims to identify and address the pedagogy of failure, and in doing so make a positive difference to students’ educational outcomes and progress. It builds on previous work [1, 2] to look at the issues behind ‘failure’ from the perspectives of individual students. In looking at the issues through the eyes of the students themselves this paper makes a distinctive contribution to current debates to the field of engineering education in general, but particularly in the areas of attrition, retention and student support. The paper ends with a total of 10 recommendations for institutions, colleagues and students

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