How does problem based learning fit with cognitive load theory?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference publication

Abstract

This paper reports on an investigation with first year undergraduate Product Design and Management students within a School of Engineering. The students at the time of this investigation had studied fundamental engineering science and mathematics for one semester. The students were given an open ended, ill formed problem which involved designing a simple bridge to cross a river. They were given a talk on problem solving and given a rubric to follow, if they chose to do so. They were not given any formulae or procedures needed in order to resolve the problem. In theory, they possessed the knowledge to ask the right questions in order to make assumptions but, in practice, it turned out they were unable to link their a priori knowledge to resolve this problem. They were able to solve simple beam problems when given closed questions. The results show they were unable to visualise a simple bridge as an augmented beam problem and ask pertinent questions and hence formulate appropriate assumptions in order to offer resolutions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe 17th SEFI Mathematics working Group Seminar
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings
EditorsBurkhard Alpers, et al
Place of PublicationBrussels (BE)
PublisherSociété Eropéenne pour la Formation des Ingénieurs
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)978-2-87352-011-3
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event17th SEFI-MWG European Seminar on Mathematics in Engineering Education - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 23 Jun 201425 Jun 2014

Seminar

Seminar17th SEFI-MWG European Seminar on Mathematics in Engineering Education
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period23/06/1425/06/14

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