Is inflammation the cause of pre-eclampsia?

Wenda Ramma, Asif Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been proposed that either excessive inflammation or an imbalance in angiogenic factors cause pre-eclampsia. In the present review, the arguments for and against the role of inflammation and/or angiogenic imbalance as the cause of pre-eclampsia are discussed on the basis of the Bradford-Hill criteria for disease causation. Although both angiogenic imbalance and systemic inflammation are implicated in pre-eclampsia, the absence of temporality of inflammatory markers with pre-eclampsia challenges the concept that excessive inflammation is the cause of pre-eclampsia. In contrast, the elevation of anti-angiogenic factors that precede the clinical signs of pre-eclampsia fulfils the criterion of temporality. The second most important criterion is the dose-response relationship. Although such a relationship has not been proven between pro-inflammatory cytokines and pre-eclampsia, high levels of anti-angiogenic factors have been shown to correlate with increased incidence and disease severity, hence satisfying this condition. Finally, as the removal of circulating sFlt-1 (soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-1) from pre-eclamptic patients significantly improves the clinical outcome, it fulfils the Hill's experiment principle, which states that removal of the cause by an appropriate experimental regimen should ameliorate the condition. In contrast, treatment with high doses of corticosteroid fails to improve maternal outcome in pre-eclampsia, despite suppressing inflammation. Inflammation may enhance the pathology induced by the imbalance in the angiogenic factors, but does not by itself cause pre-eclampsia. Development of therapies based on the angiogenic and cytoprotective mechanisms seems more promising.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1619-1627
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

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Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
Pre-Eclampsia
Inflammation
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Pathology
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Cytokines
Causality
Experiments
Mothers
Incidence
Therapeutics

Bibliographical note

© 2011 The Author(s)
The author(s) has paid for this article to be freely available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords

  • cytokine
  • inflammation
  • pre-eclampsia
  • soluble endoglin
  • soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-1
  • vascular endothelial growth factor

Cite this

Ramma, Wenda ; Ahmed, Asif. / Is inflammation the cause of pre-eclampsia?. In: Biochemical Society Transactions. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 1619-1627.
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Is inflammation the cause of pre-eclampsia? / Ramma, Wenda; Ahmed, Asif.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 39, No. 6, 12.2011, p. 1619-1627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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