London's Olympic ambassadors

a legacy for public policy implementation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As a contribution to current discussions about securing a legacy from the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, this article considers whether there are lessons for public policy implementation around volunteer involvement. Drawing on the case of the Team London Ambassadors Programme which encompassed 8,000 volunteers during the Games period, the article considers the scope for an expanded role for UK public sector organisations in the recruitment, training and management of volunteers in the future.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)577-584
Number of pages8
JournalVoluntary Sector Review
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2012

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diplomat
policy implementation
public sector
public policy
management

Bibliographical note

This is a post-peer-review, pre-copy edited version of an article published in Voluntary Sector Review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Harris, M. (2012). London's Olympic ambassadors: a legacy for public policy implementation. Voluntary sector review, 3(3), 577-584 is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204080512X658108

Keywords

  • London 2012
  • olympic games
  • volunteers
  • volunteer management
  • team London

Cite this

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London's Olympic ambassadors : a legacy for public policy implementation. / Harris, Margaret.

In: Voluntary Sector Review, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.11.2012, p. 577-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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