Mapping dissociations in verb morphology

Aureliu Lavric, Diego Pizzagalli, Simon Forstmeier, Gina Rippon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Substantial behavioural and neuropsychological evidence has been amassed to support the dual-route model of morphological processing, which distinguishes between a rule-based system for regular items (walk–walked, call–called) and an associative system for the irregular items (go–went). Some neural-network models attempt to explain the neuropsychological and brain-mapping dissociations in terms of single-system associative processing. We show that there are problems in the accounts of homogeneous networks in the light of recent brain-mapping evidence of systematic double-dissociation. We also examine the superior capabilities of more internally differentiated connectionist models, which, under certain conditions, display systematic double-dissociations. It appears that the more differentiation models show, the more easily they account for dissociation patterns, yet without implementing symbolic computations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-308
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Cognitive Sciences
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2001

Fingerprint

Brain Mapping
Neural Networks (Computer)

Keywords

  • past tense
  • morphology
  • dissociations
  • single-route
  • dual-route

Cite this

Lavric, A., Pizzagalli, D., Forstmeier, S., & Rippon, G. (2001). Mapping dissociations in verb morphology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 5(7), 301-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4
Lavric, Aureliu ; Pizzagalli, Diego ; Forstmeier, Simon ; Rippon, Gina. / Mapping dissociations in verb morphology. In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2001 ; Vol. 5, No. 7. pp. 301-308.
@article{239bb229c07a4a5a88e22b2d4b99de6e,
title = "Mapping dissociations in verb morphology",
abstract = "Substantial behavioural and neuropsychological evidence has been amassed to support the dual-route model of morphological processing, which distinguishes between a rule-based system for regular items (walk–walked, call–called) and an associative system for the irregular items (go–went). Some neural-network models attempt to explain the neuropsychological and brain-mapping dissociations in terms of single-system associative processing. We show that there are problems in the accounts of homogeneous networks in the light of recent brain-mapping evidence of systematic double-dissociation. We also examine the superior capabilities of more internally differentiated connectionist models, which, under certain conditions, display systematic double-dissociations. It appears that the more differentiation models show, the more easily they account for dissociation patterns, yet without implementing symbolic computations.",
keywords = "past tense, morphology, dissociations, single-route, dual-route",
author = "Aureliu Lavric and Diego Pizzagalli and Simon Forstmeier and Gina Rippon",
year = "2001",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "301--308",
journal = "Trends in Cognitive Sciences",
issn = "1364-6613",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "7",

}

Lavric, A, Pizzagalli, D, Forstmeier, S & Rippon, G 2001, 'Mapping dissociations in verb morphology', Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 5, no. 7, pp. 301-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4

Mapping dissociations in verb morphology. / Lavric, Aureliu; Pizzagalli, Diego; Forstmeier, Simon; Rippon, Gina.

In: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Vol. 5, No. 7, 01.07.2001, p. 301-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mapping dissociations in verb morphology

AU - Lavric, Aureliu

AU - Pizzagalli, Diego

AU - Forstmeier, Simon

AU - Rippon, Gina

PY - 2001/7/1

Y1 - 2001/7/1

N2 - Substantial behavioural and neuropsychological evidence has been amassed to support the dual-route model of morphological processing, which distinguishes between a rule-based system for regular items (walk–walked, call–called) and an associative system for the irregular items (go–went). Some neural-network models attempt to explain the neuropsychological and brain-mapping dissociations in terms of single-system associative processing. We show that there are problems in the accounts of homogeneous networks in the light of recent brain-mapping evidence of systematic double-dissociation. We also examine the superior capabilities of more internally differentiated connectionist models, which, under certain conditions, display systematic double-dissociations. It appears that the more differentiation models show, the more easily they account for dissociation patterns, yet without implementing symbolic computations.

AB - Substantial behavioural and neuropsychological evidence has been amassed to support the dual-route model of morphological processing, which distinguishes between a rule-based system for regular items (walk–walked, call–called) and an associative system for the irregular items (go–went). Some neural-network models attempt to explain the neuropsychological and brain-mapping dissociations in terms of single-system associative processing. We show that there are problems in the accounts of homogeneous networks in the light of recent brain-mapping evidence of systematic double-dissociation. We also examine the superior capabilities of more internally differentiated connectionist models, which, under certain conditions, display systematic double-dissociations. It appears that the more differentiation models show, the more easily they account for dissociation patterns, yet without implementing symbolic computations.

KW - past tense

KW - morphology

KW - dissociations

KW - single-route

KW - dual-route

UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364661300017034?via%3Dihub

U2 - 10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4

DO - 10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 301

EP - 308

JO - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

JF - Trends in Cognitive Sciences

SN - 1364-6613

IS - 7

ER -

Lavric A, Pizzagalli D, Forstmeier S, Rippon G. Mapping dissociations in verb morphology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences. 2001 Jul 1;5(7):301-308. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1364-6613(00)01703-4