Naturally occurring data as research instrument: analyzing examination responses to study the novice programmer

Raymond Lister, Tony Clear, Simon [No value], Dennis J. Bouvier, Paul Carter, Anna Eckerdal, Jana Jacková, Mike Lopez, Robert McCartney, Phil Robbins, Otto Seppälä, Errol Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In New Zealand and Australia, the BRACElet project has been investigating students' acquisition of programming skills in introductory programming courses. The project has explored students' skills in basic syntax, tracing code, understanding code, and writing code, seeking to establish the relationships between these skills. This ITiCSE working group report presents the most recent step in the BRACElet project, which includes replication of earlier analysis using a far broader pool of naturally occurring data, refinement of the SOLO taxonomy in code-explaining questions, extension of the taxonomy to code-writing questions, extension of some earlier studies on students' 'doodling' while answering exam questions, and exploration of a further theoretical basis for work that until now has been primarily empirical.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-173
Number of pages23
JournalSIGCSE Bulletin
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

Keywords

  • novice programmers
  • tracing
  • CS1
  • comprehension
  • SOLO taxonomy

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