Self-ambivalence and reactions to success versus failure

Michael Riketta*, René Ziegler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People differ in the extent to which their self-evaluations fluctuate in response to positive and negative events. This research tests whether self-ambivalence predicts this self-evaluative reactivity. Participants first completed measures of self-ambivalence and baseline self-esteem. Next, they were induced a success or failure experience in a cognitive task and finally rated their cognitive self-evaluations (taskspecific ability, state self-esteem) and affective reactions (self-feelings, mood). Self-ambivalence was associated with stronger effects of the success/failure manipulation on cognitive self-evaluations but not on affective reactions, with baseline self-esteem controlled. Possible underlying mechanisms are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-560
Number of pages14
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2007

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Riketta, Michael ; Ziegler, René. / Self-ambivalence and reactions to success versus failure. In: European Journal of Social Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 547-560.
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Self-ambivalence and reactions to success versus failure. / Riketta, Michael; Ziegler, René.

In: European Journal of Social Psychology, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 547-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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