Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

Richard A. Armstrong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In cases of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a spatial correlation between the classsic ‘cored’ type of Beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposit and the large vertically penetrating arterioles in the cerebral cortex suggesting that blood vessels are involved in the pathogenesis of the classic deposits. In this chapter, the spatial correlations between the diffuse, primitive, and classic Abeta deposits and blood vessels were studied in 10 cases of early-onset AD in the age range 40 – 65 years. Sections of frontal cortex were immunostained with antibodies against Abeta?and with collagen IV to reveal the Abeta deposits and blood vessel profiles. In the early-onset cases as a whole, all types of Abeta? deposit and blood vessel profiles were distributed in clusters. There was a positive spatial correlation between the clusters of the diffuse Abeta deposits and the larger (>10µm) and smaller diameter (<10?m) blood vessel profiles in one and three cases respectively. The primitive and classic Abeta deposits were spatially correlated with larger and smaller blood vessels both in three and four cases respectively. Spatial correlations between the Abeta deposits and blood vessels may be more prevalent in cases expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) than presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations. Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) genotype of the patient did not appear to influence the spatial correlation with blood vessel profiles. The data suggest that the larger diameter blood vessels are less important in the pathogenesis of the classic Abeta deposits in early-onset compared with late-onset AD.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationAlzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged
EditorsHyun-Sil Jeong
PublisherNova science
Pages137-153
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9781604564808
Publication statusPublished - 10 Sep 2008

Fingerprint

Amyloid Plaques
Blood Vessels
Alzheimer Disease
Presenilin-1
Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor
Arterioles
Frontal Lobe
Apolipoproteins E
Cerebral Cortex
Collagen
Genotype
Mutation
Antibodies

Bibliographical note

Available also as an ebook

Keywords

  • Clustering
  • frontal cortex
  • blood vessels
  • diffusion
  • perivascular clearance
  • spatial correlation

Cite this

Armstrong, R. A. (2008). Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In H-S. Jeong (Ed.), Alzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged (pp. 137-153). Nova science.
Armstrong, Richard A. / Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged. editor / Hyun-Sil Jeong. Nova science, 2008. pp. 137-153
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Armstrong, RA 2008, Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease. in H-S Jeong (ed.), Alzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged. Nova science, pp. 137-153.

Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease. / Armstrong, Richard A.

Alzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged. ed. / Hyun-Sil Jeong. Nova science, 2008. p. 137-153.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Armstrong RA. Spatial correlations between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits and blood vessels in early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In Jeong H-S, editor, Alzheimer's Disease in the Middle-Aged. Nova science. 2008. p. 137-153