The efficacy of local luminance amplitude in disambiguating the origin of luminance signals depends on carrier frequency: Further evidence for the active role of second-order vision in layer decomposition.

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Abstract

When an undulating surface bearing a painted texture is illuminated the resulting shading pattern produces in-phase modulations of the mean luminance (LM) and luminance amplitude (AM) of the texture. Experimentally, in-phase combinations of LM and AM (LM+AM) are seen as undulating surfaces whereas anti-phase combinations (LM-AM) are more ambiguous; being seen as undulating when presented alone but as flat when presented in a plaid with LM+AM. AM is a second-order cue and its influence on shape-from-shading can be explained with a bottom-up layer decomposition model containing second-order mechanisms. However, the role of second-order vision in layer decomposition has not been established. If second-order vision is involved in layer decomposition then the perceptual differences between LM+AM and LM-AM should depend on the properties of the carrier texture in a way that is consistent with the known properties of second-order vision. Here we find a preference for carrier frequencies 3 octaves above the modulation frequency and take this as an indication that second-order (filter-rectify-filter) mechanisms are involved in processing our LM/AM mixes. We introduce a modified model which takes into account the selectivity of second-order vision for carrier frequency.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)496-507
Number of pages12
JournalVision Research
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2011

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title = "The efficacy of local luminance amplitude in disambiguating the origin of luminance signals depends on carrier frequency: Further evidence for the active role of second-order vision in layer decomposition.",
abstract = "When an undulating surface bearing a painted texture is illuminated the resulting shading pattern produces in-phase modulations of the mean luminance (LM) and luminance amplitude (AM) of the texture. Experimentally, in-phase combinations of LM and AM (LM+AM) are seen as undulating surfaces whereas anti-phase combinations (LM-AM) are more ambiguous; being seen as undulating when presented alone but as flat when presented in a plaid with LM+AM. AM is a second-order cue and its influence on shape-from-shading can be explained with a bottom-up layer decomposition model containing second-order mechanisms. However, the role of second-order vision in layer decomposition has not been established. If second-order vision is involved in layer decomposition then the perceptual differences between LM+AM and LM-AM should depend on the properties of the carrier texture in a way that is consistent with the known properties of second-order vision. Here we find a preference for carrier frequencies 3 octaves above the modulation frequency and take this as an indication that second-order (filter-rectify-filter) mechanisms are involved in processing our LM/AM mixes. We introduce a modified model which takes into account the selectivity of second-order vision for carrier frequency.",
author = "Peng Sun and Andrew Schofield",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.visres.2011.01.008",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "496--507",
journal = "Vision Research",
issn = "0042-6989",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "5",

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T1 - The efficacy of local luminance amplitude in disambiguating the origin of luminance signals depends on carrier frequency: Further evidence for the active role of second-order vision in layer decomposition.

AU - Sun, Peng

AU - Schofield, Andrew

PY - 2011/3/2

Y1 - 2011/3/2

N2 - When an undulating surface bearing a painted texture is illuminated the resulting shading pattern produces in-phase modulations of the mean luminance (LM) and luminance amplitude (AM) of the texture. Experimentally, in-phase combinations of LM and AM (LM+AM) are seen as undulating surfaces whereas anti-phase combinations (LM-AM) are more ambiguous; being seen as undulating when presented alone but as flat when presented in a plaid with LM+AM. AM is a second-order cue and its influence on shape-from-shading can be explained with a bottom-up layer decomposition model containing second-order mechanisms. However, the role of second-order vision in layer decomposition has not been established. If second-order vision is involved in layer decomposition then the perceptual differences between LM+AM and LM-AM should depend on the properties of the carrier texture in a way that is consistent with the known properties of second-order vision. Here we find a preference for carrier frequencies 3 octaves above the modulation frequency and take this as an indication that second-order (filter-rectify-filter) mechanisms are involved in processing our LM/AM mixes. We introduce a modified model which takes into account the selectivity of second-order vision for carrier frequency.

AB - When an undulating surface bearing a painted texture is illuminated the resulting shading pattern produces in-phase modulations of the mean luminance (LM) and luminance amplitude (AM) of the texture. Experimentally, in-phase combinations of LM and AM (LM+AM) are seen as undulating surfaces whereas anti-phase combinations (LM-AM) are more ambiguous; being seen as undulating when presented alone but as flat when presented in a plaid with LM+AM. AM is a second-order cue and its influence on shape-from-shading can be explained with a bottom-up layer decomposition model containing second-order mechanisms. However, the role of second-order vision in layer decomposition has not been established. If second-order vision is involved in layer decomposition then the perceptual differences between LM+AM and LM-AM should depend on the properties of the carrier texture in a way that is consistent with the known properties of second-order vision. Here we find a preference for carrier frequencies 3 octaves above the modulation frequency and take this as an indication that second-order (filter-rectify-filter) mechanisms are involved in processing our LM/AM mixes. We introduce a modified model which takes into account the selectivity of second-order vision for carrier frequency.

UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042698911000319?via%3Dihub

U2 - 10.1016/j.visres.2011.01.008

DO - 10.1016/j.visres.2011.01.008

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 496

EP - 507

JO - Vision Research

JF - Vision Research

SN - 0042-6989

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