The Nationalist International, or What American History Can Teach Us about the Fascist Revolution

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Abstract

In challenging Marxist theorists to confront the radical rebirth at the core of the fascist revolution, Roger Griffin has carried fascist studies to a new and valuable plateau. Likewise, David D. Roberts’s elaboration of Griffin’s model offers a provocative and fruitful avenue to rethink fascist political culture. This article seeks to advance the dialogue to the next level by considering what an international approach can add to these primarily nationalist interpretations of generic fascism. Drawing on examples from the history of the United States, I argue that fascism is a fundamentally cosmopolitan process and that it needs to be placed on a broader continuum with the histories of slavery, racism and nationalism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)438-458
Journal European Journal of Political Theory
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Oct 2012

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