The overreaction hypothesis in the UK market: empirical analysis

Khelifa Mazouz*, Xiafei Li

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article tests the overreaction hypothesis using data from the UK stock market. The study covers a period of 30 years (from 1973 to 2002). The results initially seem to be consistent with the overreaction hypothesis and no obvious seasonal pattern can be identified. Our results do not depend on whether buy-and-hold returns (BHR) or cumulative abnormal returns (CAR) used to compute the returns of the arbitrage portfolio. The overreaction phenomenon is still observable even after controlling for the size effect and the time-varying nature of risk.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1101-1111
    Number of pages11
    JournalApplied Financial Economics
    Volume17
    Issue number13
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2007

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    stock market
    size effect
    empirical analysis
    market
    test
    Empirical analysis
    Overreaction
    time

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    Mazouz, Khelifa ; Li, Xiafei. / The overreaction hypothesis in the UK market : empirical analysis. In: Applied Financial Economics. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 13. pp. 1101-1111.
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    The overreaction hypothesis in the UK market : empirical analysis. / Mazouz, Khelifa; Li, Xiafei.

    In: Applied Financial Economics, Vol. 17, No. 13, 11.09.2007, p. 1101-1111.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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