The role of multicultural and colorblind ideologies and typicality in imagined contact interventions

Emilio Paolo Visintin, Michèle Denise Birtel, Richard J. Crisp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that simply imagining a positive interaction with an outgroup member reduces prejudice, especially if the outgroup member is typical of the whole outgroup. In this research, we tested how a multicultural vs. colorblind mindset might impact the efficacy of imagined contact with a typical or atypical outgroup member. Specifically, we tested the interactive effects between ideologies (multiculturalism vs. colorblindness) and the typicality of the outgroup member (typical vs. atypical) in the imagined encounter. Results revealed that participants exposed to the multicultural ideology who imagined an encounter with an atypical outgroup member expressed fewer positive perceptions (warmth and competence) toward both primary and secondary outgroups compared with respondents exposed to the multicultural ideology who imagined an interaction with a typical outgroup member, and compared with respondents exposed to a colorblind ideology (irrespective of typicality of the outgroup member). The study highlights the importance of considering the interaction between cultural ideologies and typicality during intergroup contact when designing interventions aimed at promoting positive intergroup perceptions
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
Volume59
Issue numberJuly
Early online date11 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Bibliographical note

© 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Keywords

  • multiculturalism
  • colorblindness
  • imagined contact
  • typicality
  • secondary transfer effect

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