The effects of RAMPs upon cell signalling

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Abstract

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a vital role in signal transduction. It is now clear that numerous other molecules within the cell and at the cell surface interact with GPCRs to modulate their signalling properties. Receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs) are a group of single transmembrane domain proteins which have been predominantly demonstrated to interact with Family B GPCRs, but interactions with Family A and C receptors have recently begun to emerge. These interactions can influence cell surface expression, ligand binding preferences and G protein-coupling, thus modulating GPCR signal transduction. There is still a great deal of research to be conducted into the effects of RAMPs on GPCR signalling; their effects upon Family B GPCRs are still not fully documented, in addition to their potential interactions with Family A and C GPCRs. New interactions could have a significant impact on the development of therapeutics.

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  • Effects of RAMPs upon cell signalling

    Rights statement: © 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Funding: BBSRC grants BB/M00015X/1 and BB/M000176/1

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Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Volumein press
Early online date5 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Apr 2017

Bibliographic note

© 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Funding: BBSRC grants BB/M00015X/1 and BB/M000176/1.

    Keywords

  • receptor activity modifying protein 1, G protein-coupled receptor, signalling, trafficking, coupling

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