CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells

Leanne Thomas, Peter Lambert, Lindsay Marshall, Andrew Devitt

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Rapid elimination of cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis) is vital to maintain tissue homeostasis. The phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells (AC) is mediated by innate immune molecules, professional phagocytes and amateur phagocytes that recognise "eat me" signals on the surface of the AC. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages, is widely known for its ability to recognise the pathogen-associated molecular pattern lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and promote inflammation. CD14 also mediates the binding and removal of AC, a process that is considered to be anti-inflammatory therefore suggesting CD14 is capable of producing two distinct ligand-dependent responses. Our work seeks to define the molecular mechanisms underlying the involvement of CD14 in the non-inflammatory clearance of AC.
Here we describe three different differentiation strategies used to generate macrophages from the monocytic cell line THP-1. Whilst CD14 expression was increased in each macrophage model we demonstrate significant differences in the various macrophage models' abilities to respond to LPS and clear AC. We show that CD14 expression correlates with CD14-dependent AC clearance and anti-inflammatory responses to AC. However LPS responsiveness correlates, as expected, with TLR4 but not CD14 expression. These observations suggest CD14-dependent AC clearance is not dependent on TLR4. Taken together our data support the notion that CD14 ligand-dependent responses to LPS and AC are derived from changes at the macrophage surface. The nature and composition of the CD14-co-receptor complex for LPS and AC binding and consequent responses is the subject of further study.
LanguageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010
EventBritish Society of Immunology Annual Congress - Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Dec 201010 Dec 2010

Conference

ConferenceBritish Society of Immunology Annual Congress
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period6/12/1010/12/10

Fingerprint

Macrophages
Lipopolysaccharides
Phagocytes
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
CD14 Antigens
Ligands
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Homeostasis
Cell Death
Apoptosis
Inflammation
Cell Line

Bibliographical note

Abstract published in:
Immunology (2010), BSI 2010: Abstracts Selected for Poster Presentations. Immunology, 131(s1): 131–132. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2010.03390.x

Cite this

Thomas, L., Lambert, P., Marshall, L., & Devitt, A. (2010). CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells. Poster session presented at British Society of Immunology Annual Congress , Liverpool, United Kingdom.
Thomas, Leanne ; Lambert, Peter ; Marshall, Lindsay ; Devitt, Andrew. / CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells. Poster session presented at British Society of Immunology Annual Congress , Liverpool, United Kingdom.
@conference{3e8858eb1ff4436ba96ce12ba46f9490,
title = "CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells",
abstract = "Rapid elimination of cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis) is vital to maintain tissue homeostasis. The phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells (AC) is mediated by innate immune molecules, professional phagocytes and amateur phagocytes that recognise {"}eat me{"} signals on the surface of the AC. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages, is widely known for its ability to recognise the pathogen-associated molecular pattern lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and promote inflammation. CD14 also mediates the binding and removal of AC, a process that is considered to be anti-inflammatory therefore suggesting CD14 is capable of producing two distinct ligand-dependent responses. Our work seeks to define the molecular mechanisms underlying the involvement of CD14 in the non-inflammatory clearance of AC.Here we describe three different differentiation strategies used to generate macrophages from the monocytic cell line THP-1. Whilst CD14 expression was increased in each macrophage model we demonstrate significant differences in the various macrophage models' abilities to respond to LPS and clear AC. We show that CD14 expression correlates with CD14-dependent AC clearance and anti-inflammatory responses to AC. However LPS responsiveness correlates, as expected, with TLR4 but not CD14 expression. These observations suggest CD14-dependent AC clearance is not dependent on TLR4. Taken together our data support the notion that CD14 ligand-dependent responses to LPS and AC are derived from changes at the macrophage surface. The nature and composition of the CD14-co-receptor complex for LPS and AC binding and consequent responses is the subject of further study.",
author = "Leanne Thomas and Peter Lambert and Lindsay Marshall and Andrew Devitt",
note = "Abstract published in: Immunology (2010), BSI 2010: Abstracts Selected for Poster Presentations. Immunology, 131(s1): 131–132. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2010.03390.x; British Society of Immunology Annual Congress ; Conference date: 06-12-2010 Through 10-12-2010",
year = "2010",
month = "12",
language = "English",

}

Thomas, L, Lambert, P, Marshall, L & Devitt, A 2010, 'CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells' British Society of Immunology Annual Congress , Liverpool, United Kingdom, 6/12/10 - 10/12/10, .

CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells. / Thomas, Leanne; Lambert, Peter; Marshall, Lindsay; Devitt, Andrew.

2010. Poster session presented at British Society of Immunology Annual Congress , Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells

AU - Thomas, Leanne

AU - Lambert, Peter

AU - Marshall, Lindsay

AU - Devitt, Andrew

N1 - Abstract published in: Immunology (2010), BSI 2010: Abstracts Selected for Poster Presentations. Immunology, 131(s1): 131–132. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2567.2010.03390.x

PY - 2010/12

Y1 - 2010/12

N2 - Rapid elimination of cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis) is vital to maintain tissue homeostasis. The phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells (AC) is mediated by innate immune molecules, professional phagocytes and amateur phagocytes that recognise "eat me" signals on the surface of the AC. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages, is widely known for its ability to recognise the pathogen-associated molecular pattern lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and promote inflammation. CD14 also mediates the binding and removal of AC, a process that is considered to be anti-inflammatory therefore suggesting CD14 is capable of producing two distinct ligand-dependent responses. Our work seeks to define the molecular mechanisms underlying the involvement of CD14 in the non-inflammatory clearance of AC.Here we describe three different differentiation strategies used to generate macrophages from the monocytic cell line THP-1. Whilst CD14 expression was increased in each macrophage model we demonstrate significant differences in the various macrophage models' abilities to respond to LPS and clear AC. We show that CD14 expression correlates with CD14-dependent AC clearance and anti-inflammatory responses to AC. However LPS responsiveness correlates, as expected, with TLR4 but not CD14 expression. These observations suggest CD14-dependent AC clearance is not dependent on TLR4. Taken together our data support the notion that CD14 ligand-dependent responses to LPS and AC are derived from changes at the macrophage surface. The nature and composition of the CD14-co-receptor complex for LPS and AC binding and consequent responses is the subject of further study.

AB - Rapid elimination of cells undergoing programmed cell death (apoptosis) is vital to maintain tissue homeostasis. The phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells (AC) is mediated by innate immune molecules, professional phagocytes and amateur phagocytes that recognise "eat me" signals on the surface of the AC. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on macrophages, is widely known for its ability to recognise the pathogen-associated molecular pattern lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and promote inflammation. CD14 also mediates the binding and removal of AC, a process that is considered to be anti-inflammatory therefore suggesting CD14 is capable of producing two distinct ligand-dependent responses. Our work seeks to define the molecular mechanisms underlying the involvement of CD14 in the non-inflammatory clearance of AC.Here we describe three different differentiation strategies used to generate macrophages from the monocytic cell line THP-1. Whilst CD14 expression was increased in each macrophage model we demonstrate significant differences in the various macrophage models' abilities to respond to LPS and clear AC. We show that CD14 expression correlates with CD14-dependent AC clearance and anti-inflammatory responses to AC. However LPS responsiveness correlates, as expected, with TLR4 but not CD14 expression. These observations suggest CD14-dependent AC clearance is not dependent on TLR4. Taken together our data support the notion that CD14 ligand-dependent responses to LPS and AC are derived from changes at the macrophage surface. The nature and composition of the CD14-co-receptor complex for LPS and AC binding and consequent responses is the subject of further study.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Thomas L, Lambert P, Marshall L, Devitt A. CD14 and innate immune clearance of apoptotic cells. 2010. Poster session presented at British Society of Immunology Annual Congress , Liverpool, United Kingdom.