DJ-1 in Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Insights and Therapeutic Perspectives

Mariaelena Repici, Flaviano Giorgini

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Mutations in the protein DJ-1 cause autosomal recessive forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and oxidized DJ-1 is found in the brains of idiopathic PD individuals. While several functions have been ascribed to DJ-1 (most notably protection from oxidative stress), its contribution to PD pathogenesis is not yet clear. Here we provide an overview of the clinical research to date on DJ-1 and the current state of knowledge regarding DJ-1 characterization in the human brain. The relevance of DJ-1 as a PD biomarker is also discussed, as are studies exploring DJ-1 as a possible therapeutic target for PD and neurodegeneration.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1377
JournalJournal of clinical Medicine
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2019

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Parkinson Disease
Therapeutics
Brain
Oxidative Stress
Biomarkers
Mutation
Research

Bibliographical note

© 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access
article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution
(CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Funding: Wellcome Trust WT-ISSF.

Cite this

Repici, Mariaelena ; Giorgini, Flaviano. / DJ-1 in Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Insights and Therapeutic Perspectives. In: Journal of clinical Medicine . 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.
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DJ-1 in Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical Insights and Therapeutic Perspectives. / Repici, Mariaelena; Giorgini, Flaviano.

In: Journal of clinical Medicine , Vol. 8, No. 9, 1377, 03.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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