Remembering remotely

would video-mediation impair witnesses' memory reports?

Robert A. Nash, Kate A. Houston, Kate Ryan, Nigel Woodger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Witnesses often experience lengthy delays prior to being interviewed, during which their memories inevitably decay. Video-communication technology - favored by intergovernmental organizations for playing larger roles in judicial processes - might circumvent some of the resourcing problems that can exacerbate such delays. However, whereas video-mediation might facilitate expeditious interviewing, it might also harm rapport-building, make witnesses uncomfortable, and thereby undermine the quality and detail of their reports. Participants viewed a crime film and were interviewed either one day later via video-link, one day later face-to-face, or 1-2 weeks later face-to-face. Video-mediation neither influenced the detail or the accuracy of participants' reports, nor their ratings of the quality of the interviews. However, participants who underwent video-mediated interviews after a short delay gave more accurate, detailed reports than participants who waited longer to be interviewed face-to-face. This study provides initial empirical evidence that video-mediated communication (VMC) could facilitate the expeditious conduct of high-quality investigative interviews.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)756-768
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology, Crime and Law
Volume20
Issue number8
Early online date15 Nov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

witness
mediation
video
Interviews
Judicial Role
Communication
Crime
Motion Pictures
crime film
interview
Organizations
Technology
communication technology
rating
communication
evidence
experience

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime & Law on 15/11/13, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669

Keywords

  • eyewitness memory
  • interviewing
  • rapport-building
  • videoconferencing
  • virtual justice

Cite this

Nash, Robert A. ; Houston, Kate A. ; Ryan, Kate ; Woodger, Nigel. / Remembering remotely : would video-mediation impair witnesses' memory reports?. In: Psychology, Crime and Law. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 756-768.
@article{9d3085109b4748519b418171cd0100ec,
title = "Remembering remotely: would video-mediation impair witnesses' memory reports?",
abstract = "Witnesses often experience lengthy delays prior to being interviewed, during which their memories inevitably decay. Video-communication technology - favored by intergovernmental organizations for playing larger roles in judicial processes - might circumvent some of the resourcing problems that can exacerbate such delays. However, whereas video-mediation might facilitate expeditious interviewing, it might also harm rapport-building, make witnesses uncomfortable, and thereby undermine the quality and detail of their reports. Participants viewed a crime film and were interviewed either one day later via video-link, one day later face-to-face, or 1-2 weeks later face-to-face. Video-mediation neither influenced the detail or the accuracy of participants' reports, nor their ratings of the quality of the interviews. However, participants who underwent video-mediated interviews after a short delay gave more accurate, detailed reports than participants who waited longer to be interviewed face-to-face. This study provides initial empirical evidence that video-mediated communication (VMC) could facilitate the expeditious conduct of high-quality investigative interviews.",
keywords = "eyewitness memory, interviewing, rapport-building, videoconferencing, virtual justice",
author = "Nash, {Robert A.} and Houston, {Kate A.} and Kate Ryan and Nigel Woodger",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime & Law on 15/11/13, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "756--768",
journal = "Psychology, Crime and Law",
issn = "1068-316X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "8",

}

Remembering remotely : would video-mediation impair witnesses' memory reports? / Nash, Robert A.; Houston, Kate A.; Ryan, Kate; Woodger, Nigel.

In: Psychology, Crime and Law, Vol. 20, No. 8, 2014, p. 756-768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remembering remotely

T2 - would video-mediation impair witnesses' memory reports?

AU - Nash, Robert A.

AU - Houston, Kate A.

AU - Ryan, Kate

AU - Woodger, Nigel

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Psychology, Crime & Law on 15/11/13, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Witnesses often experience lengthy delays prior to being interviewed, during which their memories inevitably decay. Video-communication technology - favored by intergovernmental organizations for playing larger roles in judicial processes - might circumvent some of the resourcing problems that can exacerbate such delays. However, whereas video-mediation might facilitate expeditious interviewing, it might also harm rapport-building, make witnesses uncomfortable, and thereby undermine the quality and detail of their reports. Participants viewed a crime film and were interviewed either one day later via video-link, one day later face-to-face, or 1-2 weeks later face-to-face. Video-mediation neither influenced the detail or the accuracy of participants' reports, nor their ratings of the quality of the interviews. However, participants who underwent video-mediated interviews after a short delay gave more accurate, detailed reports than participants who waited longer to be interviewed face-to-face. This study provides initial empirical evidence that video-mediated communication (VMC) could facilitate the expeditious conduct of high-quality investigative interviews.

AB - Witnesses often experience lengthy delays prior to being interviewed, during which their memories inevitably decay. Video-communication technology - favored by intergovernmental organizations for playing larger roles in judicial processes - might circumvent some of the resourcing problems that can exacerbate such delays. However, whereas video-mediation might facilitate expeditious interviewing, it might also harm rapport-building, make witnesses uncomfortable, and thereby undermine the quality and detail of their reports. Participants viewed a crime film and were interviewed either one day later via video-link, one day later face-to-face, or 1-2 weeks later face-to-face. Video-mediation neither influenced the detail or the accuracy of participants' reports, nor their ratings of the quality of the interviews. However, participants who underwent video-mediated interviews after a short delay gave more accurate, detailed reports than participants who waited longer to be interviewed face-to-face. This study provides initial empirical evidence that video-mediated communication (VMC) could facilitate the expeditious conduct of high-quality investigative interviews.

KW - eyewitness memory

KW - interviewing

KW - rapport-building

KW - videoconferencing

KW - virtual justice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902532995&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669

DO - 10.1080/1068316X.2013.857669

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 756

EP - 768

JO - Psychology, Crime and Law

JF - Psychology, Crime and Law

SN - 1068-316X

IS - 8

ER -