The challenges of representing human behaviour in simulation models: some case examples from supply chain, evacuation modelling and rail disruption

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

As more of the economy moves from traditional manufacturing to the service sector, the nature of work is becoming less tangible and thus, the representation of human behaviour in models is becoming more important. Representing human behaviour and decision making in models is challenging, both in terms of capturing the essence of the processes, and also the way that those behaviours and decisions are or can be represented in the models themselves. In order to advance understanding in this area, a useful first step is to evaluate and start to classify the various types of behaviour and decision making that are required to be modelled. This talk will attempt to set out and provide an initial classification of the different types of behaviour and decision making that a modeller might want to represent in a model. Then, it will be useful to start to assess the main methods of simulation in terms of their capability in representing these various aspects. The three main simulation methods, System Dynamics, Agent Based Modelling and Discrete Event Simulation all achieve this to varying degrees. There is some evidence that all three methods can, within limits, represent the key aspects of the system being modelled. The three simulation approaches are then assessed for their suitability in modelling these various aspects. Illustration of behavioural modelling will be provided from cases in supply chain management, evacuation modelling and rail disruption.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 2014
EventOR56 annual conference - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 9 Sep 201411 Sep 2014

Conference

ConferenceOR56 annual conference
Abbreviated titleOR56
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period9/09/1411/09/14

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