Gamification: using gaming mechanics to promote a business

Panagiotis Petridis, Tim Baines, Howard Lightfoot, Victor G. Shi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The use of digital games and gamification has demonstrable potential to improve many aspects of how businesses provide training to staff, operate, and communicate with consumers. However, a need still exists for the benefits and potential of adopting games and gamification be effectively communicated to decision-makers across sectors. This article provides a structured review of existing literature on the use of games in the business sector, seeking to consolidate findings to address research questions regarding their perception, proven efficacy, and identify key areas for future work. The findings consolidate evidence showing serious games can have a positive and valuable impact in multiple areas of a business, including training, decision-support, and consumer outreach. They also highlight the challenges and pitfalls of applying serious games and gamification principles within a business context, and discuss the implications of development and evaluation methodologies on the success of a game-based solution.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGrowth through servitization
Subtitle of host publicationdrivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference
EditorsTim Baines, Ben Clegg, David Harrison
Place of PublicationBirmingham (UK)
PublisherAston University
Pages166-172
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)978-1-85449-472-6
Publication statusPublished - May 2014
EventSpring Servitization Conference 2014 - Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Duration: 2 May 201414 May 2014

Conference

ConferenceSpring Servitization Conference 2014
Abbreviated titleSSC2014
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBirmingham
Period2/05/1414/05/14

Fingerprint

mechanic
decision maker
staff
methodology
evaluation
evidence
literature

Bibliographical note

© Aston Business School

Funding: PSRC Grants Ref EP/K014064/1, EP/K014072/1, EP/K014080/1

Keywords

  • gamification

Cite this

Petridis, P., Baines, T., Lightfoot, H., & Shi, V. G. (2014). Gamification: using gaming mechanics to promote a business. In T. Baines, B. Clegg, & D. Harrison (Eds.), Growth through servitization: drivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference (pp. 166-172). Birmingham (UK): Aston University.
Petridis, Panagiotis ; Baines, Tim ; Lightfoot, Howard ; Shi, Victor G. / Gamification : using gaming mechanics to promote a business. Growth through servitization: drivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference. editor / Tim Baines ; Ben Clegg ; David Harrison. Birmingham (UK) : Aston University, 2014. pp. 166-172
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Petridis, P, Baines, T, Lightfoot, H & Shi, VG 2014, Gamification: using gaming mechanics to promote a business. in T Baines, B Clegg & D Harrison (eds), Growth through servitization: drivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference. Aston University, Birmingham (UK), pp. 166-172, Spring Servitization Conference 2014, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 2/05/14.

Gamification : using gaming mechanics to promote a business. / Petridis, Panagiotis; Baines, Tim; Lightfoot, Howard; Shi, Victor G.

Growth through servitization: drivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference. ed. / Tim Baines; Ben Clegg; David Harrison. Birmingham (UK) : Aston University, 2014. p. 166-172.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Petridis P, Baines T, Lightfoot H, Shi VG. Gamification: using gaming mechanics to promote a business. In Baines T, Clegg B, Harrison D, editors, Growth through servitization: drivers, enablers, processes and impact (SSC2014) : proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference. Birmingham (UK): Aston University. 2014. p. 166-172