Screening for albuminuria in diabetes

the need to do more

J. Vamvakopoulos, R. John, S.R. Karri, S. Bellary

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

Aims: To reassess the utilisation rate of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) screening in our centre; and the rate of repeat testing, where appropriate. To look at risk factors for albuminuria in our outpatient population.
Methods: All patients attending one of our two weekly diabetes outpatient clinics in 2011–2012 were enrolled in this study. Demographic and relevant clinical data were extracted from electronic care records and analysed using SPSS 21.
Results: Our study cohort comprised 998 people (51.4% men;59.6% White, 30.5% Southeast Asian, 9.9% Afro-Caribbean),most of whom had Type 2 diabetes (82.6%). The ACR testing rate in our centre was 62.8% (2012–2013 data; previously 62.4%). The incidence of initial albuminuria was 32.2% in women vs42.8% in men. Just 48.7% of patients (44.4% of women, 51.8% of men) with initial albuminuria were retested: 36.4% of women and 19.7% of men with initial albuminuria had no evidence of this on follow-up. Logistic regression modelling confirmed an association of high systolic blood pressure with albuminuria [odds ratio1.92 (1.01–3.70 in women, 1.08–3.57 in men)]. Treatment with anangiotens in converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotens in 2 receptor blocker (A2RB) was negatively associated with albuminuria in men [odds ratio 0.42 (0.20–0.89)], but not in women.
Conclusions: A relatively high, albeit suboptimal, albuminuria screening rate in our outpatient population has been sustained.High systolic blood pressure was confirmed as a risk factor foralbuminuria. The incidence of albuminuria was higher in men, who had a lower rate of negative repeat testing and appeared to benefit more from ACEi/A2RB therapy. More rigorous screening for albuminuria is warranted to identify at-risk individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberP465
Pages (from-to)171
Number of pages1
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume32
Issue numberSuppl.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Mar 2015
EventDiabetes UK Professional Conference 2015 - ExCel London, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 11 Mar 201513 Mar 2015

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Albuminuria
Enzyme Inhibitors
Albumins
Creatinine
Outpatients
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Incidence
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Population
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Demography

Bibliographical note

Special Issue: Abstracts of the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2015, ExCeL London, 11–13 March 2015.

Cite this

Vamvakopoulos, J. ; John, R. ; Karri, S.R. ; Bellary, S. / Screening for albuminuria in diabetes : the need to do more . In: Diabetic Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 32, No. Suppl.1. pp. 171.
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title = "Screening for albuminuria in diabetes: the need to do more",
abstract = "Aims: To reassess the utilisation rate of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) screening in our centre; and the rate of repeat testing, where appropriate. To look at risk factors for albuminuria in our outpatient population. Methods: All patients attending one of our two weekly diabetes outpatient clinics in 2011–2012 were enrolled in this study. Demographic and relevant clinical data were extracted from electronic care records and analysed using SPSS 21. Results: Our study cohort comprised 998 people (51.4{\%} men;59.6{\%} White, 30.5{\%} Southeast Asian, 9.9{\%} Afro-Caribbean),most of whom had Type 2 diabetes (82.6{\%}). The ACR testing rate in our centre was 62.8{\%} (2012–2013 data; previously 62.4{\%}). The incidence of initial albuminuria was 32.2{\%} in women vs42.8{\%} in men. Just 48.7{\%} of patients (44.4{\%} of women, 51.8{\%} of men) with initial albuminuria were retested: 36.4{\%} of women and 19.7{\%} of men with initial albuminuria had no evidence of this on follow-up. Logistic regression modelling confirmed an association of high systolic blood pressure with albuminuria [odds ratio1.92 (1.01–3.70 in women, 1.08–3.57 in men)]. Treatment with anangiotens in converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotens in 2 receptor blocker (A2RB) was negatively associated with albuminuria in men [odds ratio 0.42 (0.20–0.89)], but not in women. Conclusions: A relatively high, albeit suboptimal, albuminuria screening rate in our outpatient population has been sustained.High systolic blood pressure was confirmed as a risk factor foralbuminuria. The incidence of albuminuria was higher in men, who had a lower rate of negative repeat testing and appeared to benefit more from ACEi/A2RB therapy. More rigorous screening for albuminuria is warranted to identify at-risk individuals.",
author = "J. Vamvakopoulos and R. John and S.R. Karri and S. Bellary",
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Vamvakopoulos, J, John, R, Karri, SR & Bellary, S 2015, 'Screening for albuminuria in diabetes: the need to do more ', Diabetic Medicine, vol. 32, no. Suppl.1, P465, pp. 171. https://doi.org/10.1111/dme.12668_1

Screening for albuminuria in diabetes : the need to do more . / Vamvakopoulos, J.; John, R.; Karri, S.R.; Bellary, S.

In: Diabetic Medicine, Vol. 32, No. Suppl.1, P465, 11.03.2015, p. 171.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Screening for albuminuria in diabetes

T2 - the need to do more

AU - Vamvakopoulos, J.

AU - John, R.

AU - Karri, S.R.

AU - Bellary, S.

N1 - Special Issue: Abstracts of the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2015, ExCeL London, 11–13 March 2015.

PY - 2015/3/11

Y1 - 2015/3/11

N2 - Aims: To reassess the utilisation rate of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) screening in our centre; and the rate of repeat testing, where appropriate. To look at risk factors for albuminuria in our outpatient population. Methods: All patients attending one of our two weekly diabetes outpatient clinics in 2011–2012 were enrolled in this study. Demographic and relevant clinical data were extracted from electronic care records and analysed using SPSS 21. Results: Our study cohort comprised 998 people (51.4% men;59.6% White, 30.5% Southeast Asian, 9.9% Afro-Caribbean),most of whom had Type 2 diabetes (82.6%). The ACR testing rate in our centre was 62.8% (2012–2013 data; previously 62.4%). The incidence of initial albuminuria was 32.2% in women vs42.8% in men. Just 48.7% of patients (44.4% of women, 51.8% of men) with initial albuminuria were retested: 36.4% of women and 19.7% of men with initial albuminuria had no evidence of this on follow-up. Logistic regression modelling confirmed an association of high systolic blood pressure with albuminuria [odds ratio1.92 (1.01–3.70 in women, 1.08–3.57 in men)]. Treatment with anangiotens in converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotens in 2 receptor blocker (A2RB) was negatively associated with albuminuria in men [odds ratio 0.42 (0.20–0.89)], but not in women. Conclusions: A relatively high, albeit suboptimal, albuminuria screening rate in our outpatient population has been sustained.High systolic blood pressure was confirmed as a risk factor foralbuminuria. The incidence of albuminuria was higher in men, who had a lower rate of negative repeat testing and appeared to benefit more from ACEi/A2RB therapy. More rigorous screening for albuminuria is warranted to identify at-risk individuals.

AB - Aims: To reassess the utilisation rate of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) screening in our centre; and the rate of repeat testing, where appropriate. To look at risk factors for albuminuria in our outpatient population. Methods: All patients attending one of our two weekly diabetes outpatient clinics in 2011–2012 were enrolled in this study. Demographic and relevant clinical data were extracted from electronic care records and analysed using SPSS 21. Results: Our study cohort comprised 998 people (51.4% men;59.6% White, 30.5% Southeast Asian, 9.9% Afro-Caribbean),most of whom had Type 2 diabetes (82.6%). The ACR testing rate in our centre was 62.8% (2012–2013 data; previously 62.4%). The incidence of initial albuminuria was 32.2% in women vs42.8% in men. Just 48.7% of patients (44.4% of women, 51.8% of men) with initial albuminuria were retested: 36.4% of women and 19.7% of men with initial albuminuria had no evidence of this on follow-up. Logistic regression modelling confirmed an association of high systolic blood pressure with albuminuria [odds ratio1.92 (1.01–3.70 in women, 1.08–3.57 in men)]. Treatment with anangiotens in converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotens in 2 receptor blocker (A2RB) was negatively associated with albuminuria in men [odds ratio 0.42 (0.20–0.89)], but not in women. Conclusions: A relatively high, albeit suboptimal, albuminuria screening rate in our outpatient population has been sustained.High systolic blood pressure was confirmed as a risk factor foralbuminuria. The incidence of albuminuria was higher in men, who had a lower rate of negative repeat testing and appeared to benefit more from ACEi/A2RB therapy. More rigorous screening for albuminuria is warranted to identify at-risk individuals.

UR - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dme.12668_1

U2 - 10.1111/dme.12668_1

DO - 10.1111/dme.12668_1

M3 - Meeting abstract

VL - 32

SP - 171

JO - Diabetic Medicine

JF - Diabetic Medicine

SN - 0742-3071

IS - Suppl.1

M1 - P465

ER -